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Home » Silver Blog » Types of Silver

Silver and Silver-plated, Same Value? 

Silverplate

Silverplated silverware is made of a base metal that is then coated with silver. This silver coating gives it a beautiful appearance but costs much less than Sterling silver. Silverplate feels lighter in weight for the size than Sterling silver.

Silverplate is a type of houseware that is made from base metal and plated with a thin coating of silver. It has the look and feel of sterling silver for a fraction of the cost.

 

Silverplate value is more about the antique market than it is about the metal market. One factor that will impact silverplate value is the manufacturer.

 

 

 

 

 

Sterling silver is easily identifiable by the word “Stirling” stamped on the item. This means that it is pure silver or .924 silver with the addition of .075 copper. All Sterling silver made in the United States post-1850 has “Sterling” or “.925” or “925/1000” stamped on it.

genuine silver has a high resale value

 

https://hallmarkingconvention.org/users_uploads/editor/source/Information%20Brochure%202019.pdf

 

The Convention on the Control and Marking of Articles of Precious Metals is an international treaty between States on the cross border trade in precious metal articles. It was signed in Vienna in November 1972 and entered into force in 1975.

The countries members are AUSTRIA (1975), CROATIA (2018), CYPRUS (2007), CZECH REPUBLIC (1994), DENMARK (1988), FINLAND (1975), HUNGARY (2006), IRELAND (1983), ISRAEL (2005), LATVIA (2004), LITHUANIA (2004), NETHERLANDS (1999), NORWAY (1983), POLAND (2005), PORTUGAL (1982), SLOVAKIA (2007), SLOVENIA (2009), SWEDEN (1975), SWITZERLAND (1975), UNITED KINGDOM (1976).

The Convention's Common Control Mark (CCM) has the same legal status as a national Assay Office mark. The CCM is applied by national Assay Offices to articles of platinum, gold, palladium and silver after the fineness of the alloy has been checked in accordance with agreed testing methods.

 

Articles bearing the CCM - together with the national Assay Office Mark, the responsibility mark (manufacturer or sponsor) and the fineness mark indicating its purity - do not have to be re-controlled or re-marked in the states members of the Convention.